Book reviews

Book reviews

By theword 26 May, 2016
This is the story of a young couple, Tony and Elizabeth, with an outwardly idyllic lifestyle. They have one child, a beautiful home and are successful in their careers. It soon becomes clear that behind closed doors things are not so good: their marriage is on the rocks and their lives are falling apart.

Intervention and eventual transformation come when Elizabeth, who works as an estate agent, meets a new client Miss Clara.

The film is extremely well made and rich in teaching content, but humorous too. It portrays how things can change through the power of prayer and challenges spiritual lethargy. I read the book first and was surprised to find that it was written after the DVD was made. Both are brilliant - the book expands on certain parts of the film.

I have shown the DVD to a small group of women and it resulted in a fairly new Christian asking to be mentored by someone more mature in the faith. Someone else said that since watching it her prayer life had been transformed.

We were all challenged by it and now plan to put on a church DVD night and show it to a larger gathering. Not sure what men would think to it, but I would recommend any couple struggling with their marriage to watch it.

I would give both the book and the DVD 9 out of 10.

Joy, customer

Awe

By theword 26 May, 2016

There is a war being waged for the longings and yearnings of our hearts. When God created the world He filled it with a great variety of wonderful and beautiful things for our enjoyment. The problem, as Paul Tripp explores in this book, is that ‘God intended us to be in awe of his creation, but that awe cannot and should not be an end in itself.’


The human heart is wired to worship. We are designed to be in awe of God. And yet we have misplaced our awe by reveling in created things rather than the Creator. Tripp invites us instead to come and gaze at the beauty of Jesus and stop missing out. He explains: ‘No other awe satisfies the soul. No other awe can give my heart the peace, rest, and security that it seeks.’

The book covers a great number of ways in which we have misplaced the awe which should be meant for God, but it also points us towards the hope of how Jesus came to recapture our hearts. Clearly and biblically, alongside a variety of relatable illustrations which ground the concepts in the nitty gritty of everyday life, Tripp shows how the focus of our awe literally shapes everything we think, say and do.

Much like a corkscrew being driven round and round but deeper and deeper, Tripp keeps his focus on the basic premise as he approaches it from multiple angles. The result is an often-times challenging read, where deep heart issues are exposed and ministered to. The only weakness is that occasionally the book can sound a little predictable or repetitive once you grasp the basic concept, but the worth of what is taught makes this no bad thing.

What makes this book so valuable, more than anything else, is that it comes from a place of personal honesty and vulnerability about the war that wages for our hearts. From the very first page Tripp makes an admission when he writes: ‘I wrote this book for me because, at this point in my life, I am more aware than ever that I have a fickle and wandering heart’.

Those who read this book will find their hearts challenged and enticed to seek after that spiritual food which truly can satisfy like no other. ‘Awe is a longing for a place where your hunger will be satisfied. Jesus has paid for and prepared that place for you. There is no greater grace than to be invited into the presence of such glory. There is no greater grace than to have your fickle heart forgiven and finally satisfied forever and ever.’ This book will make you uncomfortable but no matter who you are, it will give you a hunger to draw nearer to Jesus, and there is no greater thing a book can do.

Richard Williams, Assistant Pastor, Three Rivers Church Bedford
By theword 26 May, 2016
"On the Way" is a series of undated lessons for Sunday School with a three year syllabus, covering a balanced series of Biblical stories each year. I have used (and re-used) the books for 3-9 years over many years and find them simple and engaging. They have 3 copiable sheets of activities each week for 3-5s, 5-7s, 7-9s so they are ideal for a mixed-age class. Most of the activity sheets are the "cutting-and sticking" type, especially for the lower two age ranges, whilst the 7-9s appropriately have more "think about it" worksheets. I tend to mix-and- match the activity sheets
rather than sticking to the designated age categories

Sheila, Teacher

Book reviews

By theword 26 May, 2016
This is the story of a young couple, Tony and Elizabeth, with an outwardly idyllic lifestyle. They have one child, a beautiful home and are successful in their careers. It soon becomes clear that behind closed doors things are not so good: their marriage is on the rocks and their lives are falling apart.

Intervention and eventual transformation come when Elizabeth, who works as an estate agent, meets a new client Miss Clara.

The film is extremely well made and rich in teaching content, but humorous too. It portrays how things can change through the power of prayer and challenges spiritual lethargy. I read the book first and was surprised to find that it was written after the DVD was made. Both are brilliant - the book expands on certain parts of the film.

I have shown the DVD to a small group of women and it resulted in a fairly new Christian asking to be mentored by someone more mature in the faith. Someone else said that since watching it her prayer life had been transformed.

We were all challenged by it and now plan to put on a church DVD night and show it to a larger gathering. Not sure what men would think to it, but I would recommend any couple struggling with their marriage to watch it.

I would give both the book and the DVD 9 out of 10.

Joy, customer
By theword 26 May, 2016
"On the Way" is a series of undated lessons for Sunday School with a three year syllabus, covering a balanced series of Biblical stories each year. I have used (and re-used) the books for 3-9 years over many years and find them simple and engaging. They have 3 copiable sheets of activities each week for 3-5s, 5-7s, 7-9s so they are ideal for a mixed-age class. Most of the activity sheets are the "cutting-and sticking" type, especially for the lower two age ranges, whilst the 7-9s appropriately have more "think about it" worksheets. I tend to mix-and- match the activity sheets
rather than sticking to the designated age categories

Sheila, Teacher

Awe

By theword 26 May, 2016

There is a war being waged for the longings and yearnings of our hearts. When God created the world He filled it with a great variety of wonderful and beautiful things for our enjoyment. The problem, as Paul Tripp explores in this book, is that ‘God intended us to be in awe of his creation, but that awe cannot and should not be an end in itself.’


The human heart is wired to worship. We are designed to be in awe of God. And yet we have misplaced our awe by reveling in created things rather than the Creator. Tripp invites us instead to come and gaze at the beauty of Jesus and stop missing out. He explains: ‘No other awe satisfies the soul. No other awe can give my heart the peace, rest, and security that it seeks.’

The book covers a great number of ways in which we have misplaced the awe which should be meant for God, but it also points us towards the hope of how Jesus came to recapture our hearts. Clearly and biblically, alongside a variety of relatable illustrations which ground the concepts in the nitty gritty of everyday life, Tripp shows how the focus of our awe literally shapes everything we think, say and do.

Much like a corkscrew being driven round and round but deeper and deeper, Tripp keeps his focus on the basic premise as he approaches it from multiple angles. The result is an often-times challenging read, where deep heart issues are exposed and ministered to. The only weakness is that occasionally the book can sound a little predictable or repetitive once you grasp the basic concept, but the worth of what is taught makes this no bad thing.

What makes this book so valuable, more than anything else, is that it comes from a place of personal honesty and vulnerability about the war that wages for our hearts. From the very first page Tripp makes an admission when he writes: ‘I wrote this book for me because, at this point in my life, I am more aware than ever that I have a fickle and wandering heart’.

Those who read this book will find their hearts challenged and enticed to seek after that spiritual food which truly can satisfy like no other. ‘Awe is a longing for a place where your hunger will be satisfied. Jesus has paid for and prepared that place for you. There is no greater grace than to be invited into the presence of such glory. There is no greater grace than to have your fickle heart forgiven and finally satisfied forever and ever.’ This book will make you uncomfortable but no matter who you are, it will give you a hunger to draw nearer to Jesus, and there is no greater thing a book can do.

Richard Williams, Assistant Pastor, Three Rivers Church Bedford
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